For the last several weeks, it has been unbearably hot. The dry earth around the farm was crackled like raku pottery. Large spiders lived in the cool shelter of the cracks, some the size of my palm, while we giants skirted along the top of the crust. The sheep and goats, with several inches of wool or mohair on them, slept through much the day in the shade, grazing in the mornings and evenings when the temperatures duped below 100.

But for the past several days, we have had a perfect rain, that slow, steady soak we don’t usually see this time of year. Summer storms in Texas are furious, with tornado style winds and great gushes of water that run off before they soak in. But there was little wind in this storm, and it lazily drenched everything. Including goats.

image

There is a faint blush of green back again. The ground has largely swelled back to a solid mass, and the spiders have taken to the tall grasses, gleefully catching thumb sized grasshoppers.

image

Today, the animals are mostly dry again. We built them a new hoop shelter farther in the pasture, in the deep shade, to provide them a little more relief from the heat. The shelter near the house was fine in the winter, but it got hot inside in the summer. While it was raining, and the pasture got really muddy, the animals got to come into the backyard for a day and trim the landscaping. (No poisonous flowers in our yard.) It kept them from getting TOO muddy and soaked, since the shelter was better here, and kept their fleeces nice.

image

Except for Kuzu and Six. But they are fine where they are.

image

Today everyone is back where they are supposed to be, and it is kind of a relief. As much as I enjoyed watching the baby goats play in the yard, it is better to have them in the pasture, where they really belong!

About these ads